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Ric KanerProf. Richard Kaner in UCLA research team to turn carbon dioxide into sustainable concrete - The UCLA researchers are working to create a process of capturing carbon from power plant smokestacks to turn it into new building materials. The new building material could transform polluting emissions into a valuable resource.
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IllustrationProfs. David Eisenberg and Jose Rodriguez are part of the international team whose research may help reduce mosquito-carried disease -The international team has used X-rays to reveal the structure of a molecule that is toxic to disease-carrying mosquitoes. The findings move the scientific world one step closer to genetically engineering a toxin that would be lethal to species that carry dengue fever and the Zika virus.
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Tolbert ImageProf. Sarah Tolbert is part of a UCLA team whose research may lead to batteries that fully charge in minutes and last for hours - The team has made a major advance toward developing oxide supercapacitors, energy-storage devices that would combine the longevity of a battery with the fast-charge times and high-power property of capacitors.
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HoukProf. Ken Houk and his group computationally explain a breakthrough in synthesis - The enantioselective functionalization of an unactivated CH bond, two carbons away from an amide, with a chiral Pd catalyst accomplished this transformation. The reaction is already being used to produce drug candidates by pharma. The group explained through computational studies why the reaction is enantioselective and why minor modifications of Pd ligands can eliminate reactivity.
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ImageProf. Miguel GarcĂ­a-Garibay and his research team gained new insights into how matter behaves in the nanoscale world - The viscosity of an ordinary solvent (DMF), when trapped in a nanocage of a porous solid, is about 10,000 times greater than that of the bulk liquid. The research offers new insights into how matter behaves in the nanoscale world.
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Weiss Duan Illustration Profs. Paul Weiss and Xiangfeng Duan team creates a graphene barrier to control molecules precisely for making nanobiosensors - The researchers developed a sheet of graphene material with minuscule holes in it that they could then place on a gold substrate, a substance well suited for tiny nanoelectronic devices. The holes allow molecules to attach to the gold exactly where the scientists want them, creating patterns that control the physical shape and electronic properties of devices that are 10,000 times smaller than the width of a human hair.
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HarranProf. Patrick Harran and researcher advance ground-breaking chemical compound - A synthetic version of a rare natural toxin appears to hold promise for treating cancer while minimizing the harmful side effects of chemotherapy drugs.
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Koehler illustrationProf. Carla Koehler is part of a team to develop a new method to study mitochondrial DNA diseases - Mitochondrial DNA diseases are a broad group of debilitating genetic disorders that can affect the brain,heart, and muscles. This research could help scientists understand how these genetic disorders occur and lead to new treatments.

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Deming illustrationProf. Timothy Deming is part of a UCLA research team using polypeptide hydrogels for neural repair - The research could ultimately lead to new approaches to repair catastrophic spinal cord injury. Spinal cord regeneration might actually be helped by glial scar tissue, contrary to conventional wisdom. The team found that nerve cells regrow better when glial scarring is left intact.
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Bowie photoProf. James Bowie and his group have developed "synthetic biochemistry" that bypasses the need for cells - The team has devised a clever way to make a variety of useful chemical compounds, which could lead to the production of biofuels and new pharmaceuticals.
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For more news and information about the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry please visit our webpage.
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